Double Trouble Trousers and Tee

This week I made another couple of items from the two The Sewing Workshop patterns I bought online. I started with the Hudson pant, which is a really simple and subtle design. I’ve been wanting to use up my stash, particularly stuff that’s not all that nice, but that I picked up for pennies on the pound thinking I must be able to use it somehow, for something.

So I decided to use up some undyed cotton jacquard and think of it as a useable toile. I added some patch pockets. My intention was to move on to a piece of black wool with a subtle herringbone design, which I liked, but which seemed to be too thin really. You can see through it if you hold it up to the light. It also picks up every bit of lint and hair in the house. I suppose it’s not a very good quality of wool.

Somewhere along the way I decided to use the two fabrics to make an inner pant and an outer pant and sew them together so that both would be visible.

Here’s the inner pant, before I knew that’s what it would be.20171101_135851

I sewed the black pair to the beige pair at the back waist casing. I left it free at the front, except for tacking the two together at the CF. I left part of the outer legs open. I hemmed the black pair a bit shorter than the beige pair.

I also made pocket welts, without pocket bags, on the black pair. My idea was that I could slide my hands through the pocket welt openings, right into the patch pockets on the inner pant. Great idea, eh? Unfortunately, it doesn’t totally work. There are short flaps of fabric on the inside of the pocket welts, and I can’t really remove them. They get in the way, so I have to scrabble around to get to the patch pockets. Still it’s nice to stick my hands in the welts. And the inner patch pockets could be used to store money, etc. They’d be good traveling pants if one was concerned about pick pockets.

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I like them, but I’m wondering if I should sew the two pairs together at the front waist, rather than letting the black fabric flap around. Thoughts?

Then I moved on to the Trio set of patterns, and cut some grey merino wool for the long-sleeved tee. After cutting out the pieces, it looked to me like it was going to be a tight fitting tshirt, which is not something I want with lightweight jersey. I had just enough fabric left to cut a second front and back. So that’s what I did, and then basted the two fronts together and the two backs together. I’m really really glad I did that, as it has made the top much sturdier and warmer than it would have been otherwise. I’m thinking, in fact, of doing this again with some other lightweight merino wool jersey in the stash.

I have to say I’m really liking the patterns from The Sewing Workshop. I believe they’re meant for mature women. But both the pants and the sleeves were a titch too short, which is almost unbelievable. I added short cuffs to the sleeves. The pant legs are fine, although there’s not much of a hem on the longer leg (who has two legs the same length, anyone?)

 

15 thoughts on “Double Trouble Trousers and Tee”

  1. Like Catherinedaze, my vote would have been to stitch them together, but the button idea is creative and will look really cute, I think! Nice outfit, looks comfy! (I seem to be all about comfort lately….)

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    1. Thanks Jen. I’m always all about comfort. That’s the challenge for me — to make things that are as comfortable as sweatpants/tops, but much nicer. I would never be the sort of person who wears a girdle and hose at home πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Girdle and hose? I can barely remember those days (or perhaps I’ve blocked it). Oh wait, now it’s all coming back to me…ugh. And I think you’ve hit it on the head. Clothes as comfy as sweats but nice enough to be seen in!

        Liked by 1 person

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