The ‘New Severe’

This is meant as a working toile of a Burda longer length jacket, 32012, which is advertised as a Chanel type of jacket. The fabric, a small piece that I tried several other patterns on, was just big enough to make a short version. That was fine by me. I wasn’t sure what size to make, and I knew I’d have to lower the darts. This time I wanted to do it right, so I actually cut a rectangle out of the paper pattern where the dart was, and repositioned the whole rectangle down about 1 1/2 inches. After sewing up the dart on one side, I repositioned the rectangle up a titch again. The fabric is a dark purple wool with a lovely stretch because of the way it’s woven. I don’t know if there’s a name for this or not –when one side of the fabric appears to be woven as usual, with horizontal and vertical threads, but the other side appears to be woven on the diagonal? Anyway, the combination of this pretty conservative style of jacket with this dark wool gives a pretty severe look, I think.

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You can see the side panels, which I think allow more movement and comfort than the regular side-seam varieties of jackets. You can also see that the fabric takes on a chocolately hue with any kind of artificial light. It’s a good neutral.

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Looks pretty cool with a goodly dollop of orange, eh?

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Looks like I’ve got plenty of things to wear with this. The orange pants are V9035, you can see info about it here, and the wrap skirt is a vintage Vogue DKNY. See it here. The tops, oh heck I forget.

The pattern called for snaps which are a great alternative to buttons, aren’t they? I found some copper ones with writing cut into them. They were the most natural looking material I could find. I’m disappointed in the pearl, silver metal and gold metal types that my local was offering. They all look fake and cheap.

A few seam details there. I’m loving the darts, which I left open at the tip by about one stitch length to give them a nicer look. And I put on a breast pocket at the last minute, influenced by reading another article on the sexism of pocketless clothes for women. I like chest pockets anyway, and often add one to a shirt or tshirt. This time I realized that the proper placement for a breast pocket for a woman is higher up than for a man, between the collarbone and the breast. I don’t know if designers put it there, but it’s just so obviously where it should be!

This fabric really changes colour depending on the light. I think it’s going to get a lot of wear. And I’m about to lay out the pink silky wool for the longer version. Oh, first I’d better give this one an extra press. Wrinkles. I hope they weren’t a distraction 🙂

And, oh, it seems I’m on time to participate in a #dressmakingbloggerchallenge, thanks to info provided by Thimberlina here.

Humble housecoat in velvet

Anyone who reads this blog regularly probably knows that I scavenge fabric. And then create clothing with this “found” fabric, like some artists work with “found” materials.

So, I’ve had a few pieces of velvet in my closet that are way past their due date. I picked them up at an outlet store that closed down at least ten years ago. I thought one of them would be great for a housecoat, something to keep me toasty on cold winter days. Like a cardigan, but not.

I decided to use a shawl-collar pattern that I used for a charcoal duster last winter because I like the pattern, and it has few seams. With velvet, the fewer seams the better, I figure. I practiced everything — sewing with a walking foot, serging, pressing — on scraps of fabric before doing it for real. The only problem was pressing. When I pinned the shawl collar facing to the body, I realized there was a problem. It was going to be a really floppy collar and wouldn’t hold its shape. So I found a very lightweight, open-weave but crisp fabric in my stash and made interfacings. I’m happy with the result. So here it is.

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There was no fabric left to make a tie belt, and I don’t look good in them anyway, so I decided to make an obi style cloth belt for when I want to wear this closed. After constructing various types in my head for a few days, I finally remembered youtube! And yes, there were several versions. I chose the one that suggested making the belt in three parts: one front part and two side pieces. On one side you sew the side piece to the front, and on the other side you only sew the top and bottom of the side and front together, leaving a slit in the middle. I used a sample piece of a quilted fabric for one side, and some leftover silver fabric for the inside. Then I made the tie ends too narrow so I couldn’t pull them right side out. Grrrrrrr. Eventually I managed, by using a pair of tweezers.

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And here’s the last tool I had to use. Found it in my carpentry tool box.

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Can you guess what I used it for?

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I’d like to have followed up on my success with the pink coat by making another coat, but a lack of sufficient fabric for sleeves prevented me. That’s okay, as a sleeveless jacket will make a good transitional item in this westcoast climate. I did want more practice with coat-making, though, so when I saw some pretty heavy duty fabric at My Social Fabric House, I decided to snap it up, even though there was less than a yard of it.

The pattern is Burda 6989. I was most attracted to the long version, but thought the short version showed potential for some kind of in-home cardigan.

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This was a pretty easy project. The fabric, a smooth felted wool, was really easy to work with. I thought originally that it could be left unhemmed and unbound, as specified in the pattern, but slowly decided that wasn’t going to work. I bound the armholes in the fabric of the jacket, and then found some chiffon to bind the collar edges. I stitched the bottom with a coverstitch.

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I added fairly large patch pockets for a bit of interest (and convenience), and added a button and buttonhole.

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There is one thing I don’t entirely like, and that’s the width of the shoulders. I cut off quite a bit, scaling back from a size 14 to a size 12, and then cutting off the seam allowance too, as the pattern instructed. Still, I find them too wide.

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I’ve thought about cutting off another inch or two. Then I’d have to rip off all the binding and make fresh strips. But I wonder if I would like the shawl collar to extend beyond the shoulders. I’m not sure, so I’m just going to take this puppy out for walks this autumn and let it tell me whether to make changes or not.

Good thing I just made a red scarf. The Canadian election was today and red (liberal) won. So I’ll be taking my walks under a fresh government. The new Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau, just said things in his winning speech that I’ve never heard a politician say. It’s a new era, I think.