Trio trousers

Continuing with the two patterns I bought online from The Sewing Workshop, I’ve made a pair of the Trio trousers. And another Trio tshirt with doubled front and back in merino wool. This tshirt isn’t exceptional in any way really. It has raglan sleeves, a high round neck, and is meant to be tight around the hips so it grabs rather than hangs. It’s a nice alternative to the TNT long-sleeved tshirt I’ve made many variations of. But what is exceptional about it is the double layered fronts and backs that I was inspired to create. They make the tops so much cosier and warmer. Yum. I get the merino from Our Social Fabric, which sells 3-metre cuts of whatever colour they have. Usually it’s a lightweight fabric, probably used industrially for what we call around here “base layers”, which is a new word for under-wear, right?

I also got the fabric for the trousers there.

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The vest is a refashion of a poncho I bought off the back of a truck in Rome, Italy, in 1976. There are some things you can’t let go of.

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I just LOVE the trousers. You know how sometimes — all too rarely it seems — you get the style and the fabric exactly right? I’m not talking about good here, I’m talking about perfection. That happened here.

The pants are relatively loose, with short pleats on the fronts, and with two vertical seams down the pant legs, one of them curving. There’s a long, loose cargo pocket with buttonhole on each pant leg. I had bought this fabric in the summer, thinking it had a lovely drape and would be great for a pair of ultra wide pants for winter. The colour was, I thought, a perfectly acceptable neutral. Well, I decided to use the fabric for this pattern, and cut boldly and confidently because this was cheap fabric, probably some sort of blend. When I was almost done making them, curiousity inspired me to do a burn test. And yup, it burned like silk and smelled like silk. It feels luscious against the skin. It’s silk alright, and I’m glad I didn’t know that at the start. Here it is with the Hudson top I made earlier and posted about last time.

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The colour is a grey-brown, which I would still call an acceptable neutral. It goes with about 90% of my closet, so bonus! I can’t wait to make more of these — in linen, I think, for summer.

And p.s. I’m pretty sure I’ve got the first top on backwards. There’s a use for labels …

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Double Trouble Trousers and Tee

This week I made another couple of items from the two The Sewing Workshop patterns I bought online. I started with the Hudson pant, which is a really simple and subtle design. I’ve been wanting to use up my stash, particularly stuff that’s not all that nice, but that I picked up for pennies on the pound thinking I must be able to use it somehow, for something.

So I decided to use up some undyed cotton jacquard and think of it as a useable toile. I added some patch pockets. My intention was to move on to a piece of black wool with a subtle herringbone design, which I liked, but which seemed to be too thin really. You can see through it if you hold it up to the light. It also picks up every bit of lint and hair in the house. I suppose it’s not a very good quality of wool.

Somewhere along the way I decided to use the two fabrics to make an inner pant and an outer pant and sew them together so that both would be visible.

Here’s the inner pant, before I knew that’s what it would be.20171101_135851

I sewed the black pair to the beige pair at the back waist casing. I left it free at the front, except for tacking the two together at the CF. I left part of the outer legs open. I hemmed the black pair a bit shorter than the beige pair.

I also made pocket welts, without pocket bags, on the black pair. My idea was that I could slide my hands through the pocket welt openings, right into the patch pockets on the inner pant. Great idea, eh? Unfortunately, it doesn’t totally work. There are short flaps of fabric on the inside of the pocket welts, and I can’t really remove them. They get in the way, so I have to scrabble around to get to the patch pockets. Still it’s nice to stick my hands in the welts. And the inner patch pockets could be used to store money, etc. They’d be good traveling pants if one was concerned about pick pockets.

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I like them, but I’m wondering if I should sew the two pairs together at the front waist, rather than letting the black fabric flap around. Thoughts?

Then I moved on to the Trio set of patterns, and cut some grey merino wool for the long-sleeved tee. After cutting out the pieces, it looked to me like it was going to be a tight fitting tshirt, which is not something I want with lightweight jersey. I had just enough fabric left to cut a second front and back. So that’s what I did, and then basted the two fronts together and the two backs together. I’m really really glad I did that, as it has made the top much sturdier and warmer than it would have been otherwise. I’m thinking, in fact, of doing this again with some other lightweight merino wool jersey in the stash.

I have to say I’m really liking the patterns from The Sewing Workshop. I believe they’re meant for mature women. But both the pants and the sleeves were a titch too short, which is almost unbelievable. I added short cuffs to the sleeves. The pant legs are fine, although there’s not much of a hem on the longer leg (who has two legs the same length, anyone?)

 

Style lessons with knit tops

I haven’t posted anything in a while, primarily because I was knitting, but also because I was, I thought, “just” making up a few knit tops, totally easy stuff. But actually, while I was doing that, I was also experimenting and, more importantly, drawing some conclusions about what I like and what I don’t.

I started with a top I made last spring, which I tried really hard to like, but couldn’t. You can see it here. I  removed the skirt, and recut the top part from my old tried and true See and Sew B5203 pattern. Then I reattached the skirt, but along a horizontal line, after having aligned the side seams to the seams of the bodice. There was also a little flare to the skirt that I eliminated by resewing the side seam at a straight angle. Here’s the result — a top that fits me and suits me, rather than drowning me in its oversize folds. What have I learned? Go down a complete size in Vogue tops and don’t take “oversize” as written in stone.IMG_1433

I bothered with this redo because I love the colour and weave of the fabric. I still like the top best because of that. I would like it better if it had some sort of variegated hemline, which is not possible.

So I decided to make a new version of the B5203, with a “high low” hem from one side to the other. Here it is.

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Isn’t that a lovely yellow jersey? Anyway I was contemplating why I love “high low” or “variegated” hemlines so much (doesn’t matter whether the difference in length is front to back, front to sides, or side-front to side-front). And I’ve come up with an answer. Please don’t laugh, as I tell you I should be two inches taller than I am. My legs are about two inches too short for my body. Both my sister and mother have correctly proportioned legs, and they’re both about two inches taller than me. So — a variegated hem gives the appearance of extra length, because of the diagonal line that’s created. It makes me look taller. And it blurs the waist line and the crotch placement, so it disguises the leg length.

I then decided to try the free Lago pattern from Itch to Stitch. Click on the link to get it yourself.

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I like it a lot. The sides of the front pattern piece are wavey — they curve out at the bust, in at the waist, and out again at the bust. You pin and then sew that piece to the back, which has straight sides. This means the fabric skims the body, rather than squeezing it. There’s a slight razor-back, so you have to figure out bra straps, or wear a tanklet under it. I plan to make several more of these. The trousers are Vogue 9193.

And finally, I made up two versions of the Hudson top from The Sewing Workshop. IG followers will have seen that I finally put out the cash to buy two Sewing Workshop patterns, for a total of five garments. I started with what I figured would be a wearable toile in an athletic double-layer fabric. After some experimentation, I decided to cut the size XS (rather than the Medium) because that’s plenty over-size enough. Here it is, with memade fisher pants and Jon Fluevog boots. I love the neck, which is a tube cut on the diagonal for a nice drape.

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And then I went for the bright merino wool version. For this one I narrowed the sleeves at the wrists, and made the back a bit longer than the front (there are side vents separating front from back).

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Those are Vogue Marcy Tilton trousers (I can’t find the pattern envelop, sorry). And orange patent leather booties. And this leads me to two other things I’ve learned about my style preferences. First, I like to wear one colour from clavicle to ankle, and second, I like saturated colours (that might mean dark colours, or bright ones). This top to bottom orange is pretty bright, isn’t it? I spared you the matching orange down-filled sweater/jacket. I will wear this combination. I love it.

That about concludes my report on what I’ve learned over the last few months. Has anybody else learned something new about themselves recently, through sewing clothes?

 

Welting and Knitting 2

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Need I say more?

No, but I’d like to say a little about the bag, which I made from three different upholstery samples (you know those squares or rectangles that often come in a pad of several colours). I was totally constrained by the size of my samples. The bag is a good size though — it fits an 8 x 12 book or sheaf of paper. The single welt pocket will hold wallet and phone. It’s unlined because, well, it’s upholstery fabric. I copied the handle design from a leather or pleather bag I saw in a store last week. It is a long length of fabric folded wrong sides together and serged. At the shoulder point it is folded again and sewn. I think this will help the straps stay on the shoulder. I have an identical square of fabric in blue and plan on using it to make another.

The knitting is the body of the EZ yoke sweater. I removed the needles and replaced them with screw-on caps. I’m now using the needles to knit the first sleeve, using the “magic loop” method. That’s a really bizarre way of using circular needles, but it works! (there’s good info online about this method)

Valley Girl

I saw this Cali Faye Valley top online at least a year ago and loved it. I had a top like it back in the 1970’s, except in rougher fabrics. I had a small piece of swiss dot cotton, and bought a bit of rayon to complement it. It’s got pirate sleeves!

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There are many things I like about this — the front and back yokes, the single button, the wide sleeves, and the cuffs that open at the inner sleeve seam. I never wear long sleeves with the cuffs buttoned up, so having them open at the inner seam is more logical than the usual. I sewed buttons on the cuffs, but didn’t bother making buttonholes.

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I can’t help but think, though, that this looks a lot like it should be a nighty. Is it too, um, virginal for me?? I have some heavy black silk. I wonder how this would look made up in that? Sophisticated, or more like sexier lingerie?

This was a bit finicky to make. The pattern calls for only the front yoke to be lined, but I chose to line the entire yoke because the swiss dot cotton was so thin. The instructions call for sewing the yoke and the yoke lining and then sewing them together at the neckline. Then you’re supposed to sew just the front yoke to the gathered body, then flip the yoke to sew the yoke lining along the same line. It actually did work. I tried to do the same for the back, but couldn’t sew the full back yoke lining to the body that way. Anyway, it’s tricky enough to sew a yoke to a gathered piece without having to do it twice on the same sewing line. I think if I make this again (and again choose to line the whole yoke), I’ll pin both yoke and yoke lining to the body and sew it once (as you do for a standard button up shirt). Then sew the shoulders together at the end.

I think I’m going to enjoy wearing this. It’s really light and airy.

And now, I do believe I have enough summer clothes, and might take a bit of a break to do a bit of knitting.

Earth and Sun

or maybe spotted bananas ….

I decided to make the ultra wide-legged trousers I wanted by simply using a drawstring pant pattern that I’ve used before and adding five inches to the sides, both front and back. The final waist measurement is 56 inches. I put in inseam pockets, and made a waist band rather than simply double-folding the fabric to make a casing. I took a 56 inch wide strip of fabric, folded it in half with wrong sides together and pinned it to the outside of the pants. I inserted 1 1/2 inch wide elastic and then inserted some mountaineering cord in front of the elastic for a drawstring. I’ve done that before and like it. The elastic starts the job, and I can pull the cord as tight as I want on any given day.

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It was a bit windy out there today. I bought the fabric especially for them, on sale at Fabricland. It’s a cotton/linen blend. I also made the top from an old TNT pattern and a small piece of wool that I picked up at a thrift shop. It might be a wool gauze. It’s very nice anyway.

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It turns out another small linen top I made last summer also works with these pants. Yea!

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That’s it. I’m glad to have some yellow in my wardrobe. I’ve gone some yellow jersey that might go with these pants. If so, I’ll whip up a simple t-shirt.

Why did I leave that plastic bag (filled with clothes pegs) hanging off the clothesline???

Shift in Earth

Isn’t this just the plainest shift you’ve ever seen?

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I made it with fabric left over from a pair of fisherpants, to wear with the pants. The pattern is neue mode S22859. I have no idea how I came into possession of it.

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So that’s the pants and shift together. It’s a very earthy look, isn’t it? I wonder if the colour is not good so close to my face (better for bottoms than for tops?)

It is my intention to dress it up, like this:

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I’ve been seeing long dresses paired with pants, but I’m not sure how I feel about this combo. Does anyone see cultural appropriation? I’m wondering if the shift should be either bigger/looser or tighter? I made no alterations to the pattern other than to lower the bust darts about half an inch, and shorten the sleeves because I ran out of fabric. I made the necklace out of glass beads.