Shiny Duds

I’ve been having fun with a pretty long yardage of gold silk dupione that I found in a thrift shop a few months ago. If you follow my instagram account, you might have seen an unfinished version of the Tina Givens Bianca overshirt/jacket. I’ve finally finished it.

TG patterns are meant to be sewn up on the serger. Well, those that have a 3/8″ seam allowance are meant to be. Other patterns have a 5/8″ SA, and I have to say I can’t always find which it is on a particular pattern. There are never any instructions for finishing the inside — not even something as simple as “clip seams”.

Normally I’m happy to serge the SAs, but I wanted something a bit nicer on this puppy. So I spent hours making straight and bias seam binding, folding it over the SAs, and sewing it down.

I have a few bottoms that I rarely wear, partly because I haven’t had anything to wear on top with them. Now I do.

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Shiny, isn’t it?

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I had a few antique art nouveau buttons that I decided to use.

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I like the wrist detail, don’t you?

The only problem with this is that it really is dry clean only. I tried washing a small strip, and it lost all the shine.

So, as some of you know, I bought four TG patterns all at once after discovering this company and falling in love. I’ve now made 3 of them up, am planning for the fourth, and just bought another one because they were 40% off.  The pressure!

More TG and Tessuti

It was a nice morning for picture taking today, and I just finished another Tina Givens top, which I really like, so it seemed like a good time to catch you up on what’s been unfurling from the sewing machines.

Actually I’m not going to show you pix of some of it — the pair of undies and matching tshirt doesn’t need showing right now. I’m planning to do a raft of undergarments next, so maybe there will be a post with a variety of pix of whatever comes into being.

In my last post I showed a pair of Tessuti Tamiko pants in linen, and a second pair in progress. Here’s the finished second pair.

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I love these trousers. They’re made of super fine striped wool that’s somewhat transparent. I underlined them with some blush pink silk chiffon — this fabric was so delicate I would not have wanted to sew up a separate lining from it. It was much easier to spread it out over the wool pattern pieces and stitch around the edges, giving me a double layer of fabric to work with.  These are really drapey, and unbelievably, deliciously soft against my skin. I got both fabrics from Our Social Fabric, which is still operating but in a larger space . The top is from the free Lago pattern by Itch to Stitch.

I then cut and pasted my second Tina Givens pattern, the Lotus shirtcoat. This comes in two lengths and I really want the maxi length version, but to try out the pattern I made the shorter size in some serviceable cotton/poly shirting.

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Er, the top pic shows what can happen if you don’t line the right and left sides up right when you’re putting it on. I do like this, but I am having a bit of a problem with the closure. There are two vertical seams (decorative only) at the bosom area. You are to sew the buttons along one of those seams — it’s the only place where there’s more than one layer of fabric. Then you sew loops to the edge of the other side. Then you add a loop to the opposite collar end and a button … someplace inside. The logical place for that button seemed to me to be on the 1/4 inch seam. So I did that, but when I do it up, the fabric pulls visibly. I don’t have any fabric left for a longer loop, but I’m now thinking of adding a little tab to the 1/4 inch seam and sewing the button to the tab. We’ll see if that works. Also I think my loops are a little too thick. Today they’re falling off the buttons. They didn’t, of course, when I first made them ! Also I had to widen the lower half of the sleeves. They were so narrow I couldn’t bend my elbows. I do intend to make a long version in a heavier weight fabric. I have seen a few variations of shirt coats (or are they called coat dresses?) recently, so I think they may be “in”. It’s very possible that I will like them.

Finally I decided to make the simple “Holly” tunic, for which I had to go out and buy some fabric. With these TG patterns I am always thinking of a toile first, because the patterns are weird, so I wanted something inexpensive. This fabric is a floaty cotton/nylon blend. Cotton/nylon??? I’ve never heard of such a fabric. Will it be water-resistant I wonder?

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I’m not usually aiming for “pretty” when I make clothes, but I think this is very pretty. I cut this out in a size medium, but twice took in the side seams so now I think it’s a size small. It has grown-on sleeves, and it’s kind of hard to fit those correctly I find.

Oh heck, I still have some space here, so take a look at these man-shorts I made from a 1977 pattern for misses and men’s shorts and trousers. They have a button fly, button and loop closure and drawstring without any elastic. I made them from an ultra lightweight cotton poplin for the heat we’ve been having this summer. They are delightfully cool.

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Oops, heh heh, no bra. I don’t think I’ve had shorts that ended above the knee in at least a decade. I guess we’re never too old to reveal some flesh!

So that’s it for July. I hope your summer is going well — I know people are burning up all over North America and Europe so take care of yourselves.

 

Lagenlook at last

It was only a couple of weeks ago that I discovered the patterns produced by Tina Givens, available at tinagivens.com. They took my breath away. I immediately purchased two pdf patterns, then a few days later downloaded a couple of freebies, then after the announcement of a half price sale, bought four more. That’s right. I now have eight patterns from one pattern company, all purchased within days of each other. I had to lie down and rest after that burst of spontaneity.

This is the first of them, something called “smock-it”. I liked the vertical lines of the loose princess seams and thought they would help me look long instead of squat. I also thought I could use those lines to determine fit. It can be so hard when making loose, over size clothing to know the “right” size. I first cut the size large, basted the pieces together and decided I was a medium after all. I took it apart and recut the pieces.

The fabric was from my stash, a couple of pieces that I had bought because I liked the colours. Other than colour, neither was something I was really fond of. Well, I loved the batik piece, but I knew I’m not a batik clothing kind of a person. But they were both thrifted pieces, and I figured I could always make toiles out of them. Pardon me for patting myself on the back but I do think combining the two was a brilliant idea.

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This is a completely new look for me. I think it might take some time for me to be comfortable enough in it to wear it at home. Or maybe it’s just not quite the season for this yet.

Here are shots of a couple of details of the pattern.

I used some of the batik for the front pocket bag, and the other photo is of three pleats that occur on each side of the side back panels.

I’ve got a couple of other items in progress right now, but then I’ll tackle some more of these 8 patterns. I’ve got lots of great silks and linens in the stash that I want to use up.

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They should make smashing robe-like tunics/shirts, don’t you think?